Traditional Masonry Practice

and New Approaches to Preservation Education [WS1]

(Based on Track 2—The Foundations of Cooperation: The Collaborative Act of Preservation)

This workshop will present new studies on Charleston’s Old City Jail, including research about the jail building phases, the materials used in its construction, present issues due to these materials failing and analysis of these materials, presented by well-known figures from both APT and PTN in the masonry field. You'll develop your understanding of the characteristics and challenges of a range of masonry materials and proper techniques for applying these materials, how the interaction of iron can affect a masonry structure and its conservation, and how the findings from the recent material analysis impact the application of masonry materials on this building.

You will also learn about the development of a new approach to preservation/construction education that not only integrates a liberal arts curriculum with the Building Arts but also works collaboratively with national preservation practioners and companies to train a new generation of craftspeople in the building arts. The workshop format will include a mixture of lectures, discussion and demonstrations.

Schedule:

Day 1
Wednesday, October 3
8:00–5:00     In the classroom and in the field at the Charleston Old City Jail
5:00–6:00     Reception

Day 2
Thursday, October 4
8:00–5:00     In the classroom and in the field at the Charleston Old City Jail
5:00              Adjourn

Skill Level: Beginner and Intermediate

Fee:  $415 Includes: Breakfasts, Lunches, Materials, Wed Night Reception
Location:   Charleston Old City Jail
Transportation:   Walkable
Dress Code:   Casual/Jeans with work boots or sturdy walking shoes 
Recommended Equipment:   Notebook, camera, safety glasses
Maximum Attendance:   45
Handicapped Accessibility:   The Old City Jail has no elevator and limited wheel chair access. Every effort will be made to allow access within the constraint of the historic building.
Continuing Education Credits: Yes

Workshop Coordinator:

Jamie Duggan, Owner, Preservation Unlimited, LLC, and Educator, jduggan@preservationunlimited.com or (802) 249-7231

Mr. Duggan is Vice President of the PTN Board, preservation contractor, consultant and educator based in Montpelier, VT who specializes in the conservation of historic masonry and plaster. He holds a Master of Science from the University of Vermont’s Graduate Program in Historic Preservation where he is a frequent Lecturer. He currently teaches Architectural Materials Testing at the Hancock Shaker Village for the University of Massachusetts-Amherst Historic Preservation Program and is a faculty member at Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Warren, VT.

Facilitators and Partners:

  • Andy deGruchy, Owner/Consultant, Limeworks.us, Milford Square, PA, USA
  • David Payne is Professor of Preservation and Architecture Design at the American College of the Building Arts, Charleston, SC, USA
  • Dr. Gerard Lynch PhD, is a PTN board member, an internationally acclaimed and highly respected historic brickwork consultant, master bricklayer, educator and author. He is the 2007 recipient PTN’s highest honor the Askins Achievement Award. England.
  • Ken Uracius, a restoration mason and Vice President of Stone & Lime Imports, Inc., has worked in masonry restoration and in commercial and industrial masonry construction for more than 30 years. Ken was directly involved in rediscovering the history and reproducing the manufacturing techniques for historic natural cement materials. M.A.
  • Simeon Warren is Dean of the American College of the Building Arts, traditionally trained stone carver trained at Lincoln Cathedral and former Vice President of PTN and board member of APT. England and Charleston, SC, USA
  • Stéphanie A. Cretté, PhD, is a Research Scientist and Nestor González-Pereyra is a Research Engineer at the Warren Lasch Conservation Lab/Hunley Conservation Team
  • John Walsh is the founder and president of Highbridge Materials Consulting. He holds a Master’s Degree from Columbia University as a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow and a B.S. in Geology with Honors from Queens College, CUNY. John specializes in the microscopical and chemical analysis of historic mortars, concrete, and building stone and has a special interest in historical binders.
  • Magdalena Malaj is senior chemist at Highbridge Materials Consulting.  She holds a Master’s Degree in electrochemistry of corrosion and surface phenomena and a Bachelor’s Degree in general chemistry from the University of Tirana, Albania. Magdalena specializes in inorganic analytical chemistry with an emphasis on developing methods for isolating and analyzing the binder components of historic mortars and stuccos. Additionally, she has studied pore size distributions and water and vapor transport characteristics of masonry materials.
  • Mark Mordhorst, Project Director at Hayles and Howe, Inc., Baltimore, MA, USA

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the characteristics and challenges of a range of masonry materials and proper techniques for applying these materials.
  • Discuss how the interaction of iron can affect a masonry structure and its conservation.
  • Use the material analysis undertaken on Charleston’s Old City jail over the last six months to use those findings to describe the impact the application of masonry materials on this building.
  • Describe a new approach to preservation/construction education that not only integrates a liberal arts curriculum with the building arts but also works collaboratively with national preservation practitioners and companies to train a new generation of crafts people in the building arts.
APT-PTN 2012 is sponsored by: