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Preservation Engineering Workshop APTI Québec City 2014

Posted on Wednesday, November 12, 2014 by Ken Follett Comments (0)

I very much enjoyed the two days of intensive presentations of engineering perspectives and projects as they apply to the historic built environment. Though I am neither a structural engineer, an architect, or quite a contractor (though that is my background experience) on a personal level I found the time spent with a few of the top engineers who identify themselves as in the preservation industry quite rewarding. One friend, an architect, at the APTI conference asked if I was intending late-in-life to become an engineer, to which I replied in short, “No, but I do need to know how they think.” In this respect I found the preservation engineering workshop to be perfectly rewarding.


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Monuments session raises tough questions and unique challenges

Posted on Saturday, November 8, 2014 by Jennifer Schork Comments (0)

Thanks to the outstanding coordination by chair Victoria Angel, the session on monuments (CS03) presented conference attendees with in-depth look at the approaches taken to conserve several monuments and historic structures.


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APT Gala Tribute Event

Posted on Wednesday, October 29, 2014 by Lonnie Hovey, AIA, FAPT, NCARB  Comments (0)
Well, if you weren’t at the APT Gala Tribute Event, you missed an extraordinary happening. We had an excellent dinner of tender, “melt-on-your-mouth” beef cooked to perfection, and glasses that seemed to be constantly full of wine, water, coffee, or your beverage of choice.
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College of Fellows Lecture

Posted on Tuesday, October 28, 2014 by Lonnie Hovey, AIA, FAPT, NCARB  Comments (0)
Once again, the College of Fellows Lecture did not disappoint to provide a speaker with a thought provoking topic. This year, Trevor Marchand discussed the World Heritage Site of the D’jenne Mosque. The mosque is the largest extent mud building in the world. A wonderful fact is that the towers are topped with gleaming white ostrich eggs!
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Opening Session Brings New Perspective on North American History – Thru a French Lens

Posted on Tuesday, October 28, 2014 by Lonnie Hovey, AIA, FAPT Comments (0)

The opening keynote session by David Mendel, President of Mendel Tours of Quebec, provided a great overview to the history of Quebec and the city’s highs and lows through history.  Its location where the St. Lawrence River narrows is the first nation’s meaning of the city’s name (where the river narrows).  The city was founded in 1608 by Samuel de Champlain, and began as a small fur trading city.  The bluffs/cliffs surrounding the city on three sides provided the city with a natural defense, and defensible stone walls were built on its west for further defense.   In 1663, France, supported by Louis the 14th, transformed the empire of Canada and North American claiming the lands and waterways west of the English colonies set up along the eastern seaboard.  This expansion of New France had great alliances with the tribes of the first nation’s as the number of settlers from France were less threatening and less in number than those from England.  New France fell after the 1760s, as the English colonies were expanding, and because New France was not a supporter of the American Revolution.  The speaker showed how many American cities were founded as French cities and forts (Detroit for example was a French port pronounced “De-twa”). 


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Welcome to the APT Blog

"It has been said that, at its best, preservation engages the past in a conversation with the present over a mutual concern for the future."
- William Murtagh, Keeping Time: The History and Theory of Preservation in America

In our increasingly digital age, the face and form of this conversation is transforming. Social media has become a driving and influential force in every aspect of our lives: politics, community, religion, entertainment. It should be no surprise that the preservation field is wholeheartedly embracing social media outlets. A quick internet search of something as simple as "historic preservation blog" resulted in more than 86,000 results.

The Association for Preservation Technology International is pleased to add our voices to this new conversation.

For over forty years, APT has been a leader in preservation technology, providing not only education and technical training opportunities but also providing a social venue for the sharing of experience and knowledge. This blog is a new approach to hosting our part of the conversation between the past and the present, developed around a user-generated dialogue and aimed at promoting interaction and participation.

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