APT Kansas City 2015 - November 1-5 - The Brass on Baltimore

Half Day Field Sessions, Wednesday

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All sessions include a box lunch and materials. Boxed lunches for FS11 - FS16 can be picked up in the Grand Lobby, The Brass on Baltimore. Plan on arriving 30 minutes prior to start time listed. FS17 lunch will be provided at the Bolling Building.


FS11
The Harry S Truman National Historic Landmark District: The Challenges of Preservation and Neighborhood Revitalization  
Wednesday, November 4, 2015, 1:00–5:00pm

When was the last time you walked in the footsteps of a U.S. President? The hometown of President Harry S Truman provides a unique and rare glimpse into the daily life of Truman, both before and after his presidency. This field session will visit the Harry S Truman National Historic Landmark (NHL) District, one of the country’s only districts located within a neighborhood still owned by individual property owners. The tour will include an exclusive look at the Truman and Noland Homes, part of the Park Service’s Harry S Truman National Historic Site Complex. We will also tour the NHL District that includes the historic visitor’s center, historic Truman Courthouse and a complex of homes owned by the Truman, Noland, and Wallace families (relatives of Harry and Bess Truman) run by the National Park Service. (Photo courtesy Urdangaray, Wikimedia Commons)

Fee: $60
Capacity: 30
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
CEUs: 3.0 LU


FS12 FULL, waiting list only.
From Gulley Town to a City Beautiful: Kansas City's Parks and Boulevards        
Wednesday, November 4, 2015, 1:00–5:00pm

Travel back in time along Kansas City's famous parks and boulevards system! Participants will learn about the philosophies of the City Beautiful Movement and the development patterns of Kansas City in the context of this major civic undertaking.  Designed by city planner and landscape architect George E. Kessler beginning in 1893, the system culminated in 90 miles of boulevards and 2,500 acres of urban public parks. The bus tour will travel along this expansive boulevard network and view the fountains, monuments and grand architecture that line its streets; some pristinely preserved and some suffering from neighborhood disinvestment and neglect. The tour will include stops at various public monuments and the 72 room R.A. Long Mansion, now Corinthian Hall at the Kansas City Museum.

Fee: $60
Capacity: 25
Dress Code: Casual, dress in layers with good walking shoes
CEUs: 4.0 LU


FS13
Approaches to Historic Site Preservation: Watkins Mill State Historic Site and Atkins-Johnson Farm and Museum
Wednesday, November 4, 2015, 1:00–5:00pm

This field session will visit two historic sites in the Kansas City region that now function as museums. The sites showcase two prominent industries- wool production and agriculture- that shaped the region’s economy in the 1800s. The field session will offer a comparison of two historic sites that showcase different approaches to house museum interpretation and preservation. It will also discuss the installation of modern insulation and the introduction of modern mechanical and electrical systems in historic structures and how these sites balanced the quest for energy efficiency with the principle of protecting historic material.

Watkins Mill State Historic Site is a National Historic Landmark and a National Engineering Landmark as a unique representation of an intact 19th century woolen-factory. Located in rural Platte County, the site contains an 1860 Woolen Mill and 1854 Watkin’s House. Both have been interpreted to represent the 1870s, the height of the mill’s production, and illustrate the daily activities of the mill and household.  The tour will focus on the mill, which has been preserved and contains original equipment and machinery. It has no modern HVAC systems, and limited plumbing/ electricity. The site is open year-round for public tours.

The Atkins-Johnson Farm and Museum is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as an intact farmstead from the early 20th century. Located in the Kansas City Metropolitan Area, the 1834 log cabin was converted to an I-house in 1853, and is the oldest continuously occupied house in Clay County. A recent interior and exterior restoration updated HVAC and electrical systems and building finishes. As part of the restoration, “truth windows” in the walls and floors illustrate the multiple layers of history and highlight the changes over time. The site is open April-November for public tours.

Fee: $60
Capacity: 30
Dress Code: Casual, with good walking shoes
CEUs: 3.0 LU


FS14
Modern Heritage Bus Tour - Preserving the Recent Past in Kansas City
Wednesday, November 4, 2015, 1:00–5:00pm

Travel back to 1960s and 70s on this tour of Kansas City’s mid-century modern heritage. Led by the Historic Kansas City Foundation and KC Modern, the tour will highlight structures by noteworthy mid-century modern architects such as SOM, Bruce Goff and Helmut Jahn.

Significant stops on the bus tour include:
• The BMA Tower by SOM (1961), the first new steel-framed high rise in Kansas City after the Great Depression. Situated by a park, on one of the highest points in the metro area, the BMA Tower embodies the Miesian modern movement in Kansas City.
• The eclectic Nicols House by Bruce Goff (1967), a unique mid-century modern residence just south of the Kansas City Art Museum. Inspired by Antoni Gaudi’s organic architecture, Goff’s architecture takes on a life of its own sitting next to its colonial-style neighbors.
• Kemper Arena (1973), notable German architect Helmut Jahn’s first major work. Learn about the enormous advocacy effort led by the local community to keep the Kemper arena from demolition.

In addition to presenting an overview on the history of each building, this field session will focus on the past and present challenges these two organizations have faced in retaining Kansas City’s mid-century modern architecture.

Fee: $60
Capacity: 25
Dress Code: Casual, with good walking shoes
CEUs: 3.5 LU / HSW


FS15
The History and Maintenance of Fountains in Kansas City
Wednesday, November 4, 2015, 1:00–5:00pm

Kansas City is known as the City of Fountains and claims to have more fountains than the city of Rome. While this may be a bit of an exaggeration, we do have many fountains of various sizes, materials, and physical condition dating back to the late 19th century. Most of the fountains will have been turned off for the winter season so we will be able to get up close and person with them while others are left on for the winter making for interesting contrasts in their condition. A local historian will discuss the history of the fountains, a representative of the Kansas City Parks and Recreation Department will discuss the multitude of maintenance challenges related to the fountains, and an art conservator will discuss materials and techniques used in the treatment of the fountains. There will even be the opportunity to go underground into an equipment vault to view the apparatus required to operate a fountain.

Fee: $60
Capacity: 25
Dress Code: Casual, with good walking shoes
CEUs: 3.0 LU


 

FS16 FULL, waiting list only.
Evolution of Preservation Treatments for the Architectural and Structural Concrete at Historic Unity Village
Wednesday, November 4, 2015, 1:00–5:00pm

In 1919 Charles and Myrtle Fillmore, founders of the Unity spiritual movement, bought 58 acres of land about 15 miles from downtown Kansas City, Missouri. Originally intended as a weekend and vacation getaway for Unity workers, the area grew into Unity Farm and became nationally known for its orchards and apple products. In 1953, the farm was incorporated as a Missouri municipality – Unity Village. Today, the 1,200 acre property serves as the world headquarters. The distinctive English Cotswold and Italian architecture was designed in the 1920’s by Rickert Fillmore, a son of the founders. Rickert, an artist and architectural enthusiast, created the master plan for Unity Village and oversaw its construction from 1929 until his passing in 1965.  

Two of the buildings at Unity Village are included on the National Register of Historic Places; Unity Tower and the original Silent Unity Building, now known as the Education Building. The 165 foot tall Unity Tower was designed in 1927 and completed in 1929.  It has been fully renovated in recent years.  Unity Village has ten fountains on the campus.  The most spectacular is a series of three mirror pools and fountains that cover 14,090 sq. ft., or about a third of an acre, across the central courtyard.  These central courtyard  fountains and surrounding area were restored to their original beauty in 2010.

The campus contains many historic and modern buildings, all in the same Mediterranean style. Cast-in-place, and precast concrete and architectural cast stone, fabricated on site, have been used throughout the complex. The maintenance and repair of these aging concrete elements is an ongoing and difficult challenge for Unity. This Field Session will explore the many diverse concrete elements of the Unity campus, and delve into the challenges, including successes and failures, faced in recent renovations and repairs that have been undertaken to major facilities in the central campus. The session will also include a discussion of the various preservation options that are being considered for the Unity Administration Building and other facilities on campus. (Photo courtesy of unityvillage.org)

Fee: $60
Capacity: 25
Dress Code: Casual, with good walking shoes
CEUs: 3.75 LU


FS17
Modernizing Modern:  Preserving and Renewing the Mid Century Bolling Federal Building
Wednesday, November 4, 2015, 1:00–5:00pm.  Walking tour, lunch provided at the Bolling Building.
First priority for FS17 will be given to those signed up for the Symposium on Thursday, November 5. Those not signed up for the Symposium will be put on a waiting list.

Offered as a companion session to this event, FS17-Modernizing Modern:  Preserving and Renewing the Mid Century Bolling Federal Building is an exciting opportunity to participate in an insider’s tour of one of GSA’s largest facilities, recently rehabilitated to improve building performance and energy efficiency.  Space is limited and priority registration is given to those registered for the Symposium. 

Completed in 1965*, three years after the Kennedy administration issued new “Guiding Principles for Federal Architecture,” the 18 story Richard Bolling Federal Building exemplified a shift in federal public buildings design from traditional monumental architecture to contemporary construction emulating corporate architecture of the time.

Despite its corporate architectural vocabulary, however, the Federal Building was conceived from the start as a public place, housing a planned population of 2,800 federal agency employees, retail shops, a post office, and cafeteria.  Extensive self-protection features, programming, and procedures led to the building’s designation as GSA’s continuous operation headquarters in the event of an emergency shutdown in Washington.  A recently completed $250,000,000 rehabilitation begun in 1999 has brought the building up to current energy, security, fire safety, building performance and workplace standards while respecting its Mid-Century Modern design. Initial improvements added a sympathetic entry pavilion and plaza improvements designed by BNIM Architects. The Leed Silver project reduced thermal leakage by 50 percent; new HVAC systems yielded a 40 percent reduction in energy use. Exterior cisterns now capture 95 percent of storm runoff to irrigate landscaping.  A green roof has been added. The plaza now has native grasses, bioswales to enhance security and retain water, and more trees than any other property in downtown Kansas City. GSA commissioned Helix Architecture + Design, who designed most of the rehabilitation, to develop Master Standards of Design to serve as a guide for future changes to the facility.

The presentation and tour will examine the building’s history and original design, GSA’s reinvestment approach to improving the building’s functional, financial, and energy performance; and the design team’s problem solving approach to balancing the project’s preservation, conservation, lifecycle cost and marketability goals. Topics include: envelope and building system performance, space planning for a mobile, collaborative workforce, improving daylighting and wayfinding in a large floorplate; balancing security and public access and sustainable landscape renewal.

Fee: $60
Capacity: 40
Dress Code: Casual, with good walking shoes
CEUs: 4.0 LU / HSW

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