WEDNESDAY FIELD SESSIONS

 FS12
Mission Churches Interiors

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 2, 2016, 1:00pm-4:00pm
Location: Mission Reach area of San Antonio
Fee: SOLD OUT $75
Capacity: 25
Dress Code:   Casual, dress in layers with good walking shoes 
CEUs: 3.00
Join this field session for a private tour of four of San Antonio’s World Heritage mission churches.  Join conservators and managers to discuss the past, present, and future preservation projects at each of the church interiors as well as for an interesting dicussion on the relationship and balance between the religious organizations and Government regarding the use and preservation of the historic sites.

 


 
FS13
Thematic Theaters

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 2, 2016, 1:00pm-4:00pm
Location: Downtown San Antonio
Fee: SOLD OUT $75
Capacity: 25
Dress Code:   Casual, dress in layers with good walking shoes 
CEUs: 3.00
The Alemeda was one of the last grand movie palaces built in America, opening on March 9, 1949 as the largest movie palace ever dedicated to Spanish language films and performing arts. Over 1,050 pieces of cold cathode adorn the 86-foot tall marquee. The interior boasts phosphorescent black light murals and neon lit plexiglas line the walls and staircases. The theater was the winner of the most outstanding theater in the country in 1949 and is currently being rehabilitated after years of neglect. The Aztec, built in 1926, is a notable example of exotic-theme motion picture palaces during the economic boom of the 1920s. The Aztec features vibrantly colored columns, sculptures, furnishings and murals, many of which are authentic reproductions of Meso-American artifacts, and a two-ton chandelier recently restored by the grandson of the original designer.  Opening in 1929, the Greater Majestic was second in size only to Georgia’s Fox Theatre in Atlanta and was the first theatre in Texas to be fully air-conditioned. Inspired by San Antonio’s Spanish and Moorish heritage, The Majestic is one of America’s grand surviving atmospheric theaters. The inside the auditorium is decorated with stuffed birds, Greek, Roman, and Renaissance sculptures, and sky of floating clouds and twinkling stars.  Designed as a European-style opera house, the Empire Theatre opened in December 1914 as the first modern theatre in San Antonio. It boasted electric lighting, fans, and motorized stage equipment. The interior was plush and elegant, with gilding covering nearly every piece of plasterwork. After a flood in 1921 filled the theatre with 9 feet of water, destroying much of the plaster, the entire theater was painted white. The theatre, plasterwork and gilding were restored in 1998.

 


FS14
Parks & Plazas

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 2, 2016, 1:00pm-4:00pm
Location: Downtown San Antonio
Fee: $75
Capacity: 25
Dress Code:   Casual, dress in layers with good walking shoes 
CEUs: 3.00
San Antonio is home to an impressive system of public spaces including some of the oldest parks and plazas in the country. Participants will visit three distinct sites in and near downtown: Military & Main Plaza, Travis Park, and San Pedro Park.  The Main & Military Plaza Historic District captures San Antonio’s development from an early Spanish Presidio to a vibrant commercial center over nearly three centuries. Main Plaza, established as a market square in 1731, is surrounded by the San Fernando Cathedral and Bexar County Courthouse. Military Plaza, originally a parade ground and market square for Spanish soldiers, is now dominated by City Hall. Today the plazas are used by tourists and locals for a variety of purposes, from recreation and social events to religious and government functions as well.  Travis Park, named for the commander of the Texans at the Battle of the Alamo, was established in 1870. The development of the park into a formal urban square was a result of the City Beautiful Movement, and included the creation of the Confederate Civil War Monument in its center. This monument, installed in 1899, was controversial even as it was being erected. The City of San Antonio Center City Development & Operations worked to revitalize Travis Park with new creative programming, improved landscaping and seating, a small dog park, and designated space for food trucks.  San Pedro Park, the oldest park in Texas, was created by the City of San Antonio in 1858 on the site of a natural spring at which Native Americans had gathered prior to European settlements in Texas. After a rocky start (the site was used as a prison during the Civil War), early improvements included landscaping, ponds for fishing, boating, and swimming, bathhouses, a small zoo, racetrack, and pavilion. By 1878 a streetcar line traveled from Alamo Plaza to San Pedro Springs Park. The zoo was moved to Brackenridge Park in 1915, but the city built a municipal swimming pool, community playhouse and library on the property in the 1920s. Most of these nearly century-old structures are extant and functional today.

 


 FS15
Enhancing an Historic Modern Campus — Trinity University

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 2, 2016, 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Location: Trinity University
Fee: $75
Capacity: 25
Dress Code:   Casual, dress in layers with good walking shoes 
CEUs: 3.50
Trinity University, designed by San Antonio native O'Neill Ford, is one of the great examples of regional modernism in an American University.  As Trinity grows and new pedagogical models emerge, managing and embracing change has been key to raising Trinity's profile in the academic world.  This tour will look at the historic campus and examine the initiative undertaken by Trinity and its architect, EYP, in realizing a new Center for Sciences and Innovation that builds upon Ford's original vision with a strategy that carefully balances addition, rehabilitation and even key removal to realize a cutting edge 21st century academic facility as a logical extension of the historic mid-20th century campus.

 

 


 FS18
Conservation Challenges at the Alamo Shrine

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 2, 2016, 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: The Alamo Shrine
Fee: $75
Capacity: 20
Dress Code:   Casual, dress in layers with good walking shoes 
CEUs: 3.0

This half day field session will focus on the issues at the Alamo Shrine. In addition to a condition assessment, we will look at stone and mortar issues and what types of testing programs can be created to understand the mechanisms of deterioration as well as creating a testing program, environmental impacts, structural assessments and long term monitoring. The field session will take place at Alamo Hall and include a walk through of the site.



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