Best Rates Now! Early Bird Deadline is August 9

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Building Restoration Contractors Association
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APT NYC 2013 - “PRESERVING THE METROPOLIS”

OCTOBER 12 - 15, 2013 AT THE NEW YORK MARRIOTT MARQUIS IN NEW YORK CITY

Best Rates Now! Early Bird Deadline is August 9

Half Day Field Sessions 5-15

Offered Monday, October 14

FS05 Class and Row Houses in Park Slope: Development and Preservation of Urban Architecture
8:30-12:30   

clientuploads/2013_conference_art/FS05 Class Row cropped.jpgTour residential architecture in central Park Slope (Brooklyn), with a discussion of 19th century urban/suburban development patterns, the influence of outside features--man-made (Prospect Park) and natural (the Gowanus Canal)--and social stratification as visible in the architectural design of functionally-similar rowhouses.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn patterns of 19th-century urban residential development
  2. Identify target buyers for 19th-century rowhouses through architecture
  3. Review cycles of urban decay and renewal through state of rowhouses.

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 25
Transportation: Subway
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5

Facilitator/Coordinator:

  • Donald Friedman, Old Structures Engineering

FS06 Croton Aqueduct Hunting in Manhattan: A Preservationist's Perspective
8:30-12:30

clientuploads/2013_conference_art/FS06 Gatehouse cropped JPEG.JPGThe Old Croton Aqueduct, constructed between 1837-1842 and extended in subsequent campaigns, stretches 41 miles and once served to distribute water from the Croton Reservoir in Westchester County to Manhattan. The field session will trace physical evidence of the Aqueduct in Upper Manhattan and Morningside Heights. As the City's first municipal public water supply,  it was internationally recognized at the time of its completion as a model for other cities in the United States.

The landmarks of the Croton Aqueduct, sometimes monumental and sometimes humble, offer an unparalleled infrastructural lens through which to view the city's historic urban fabric. Many of these landmarks, such as the High Bridge and several gatehouses, will serve as a visual textbook as we examine the infrastructure that provided running water to the city's residences and public facilities for over a century, and learn how this drastically improved the quality of life for New Yorkers. Along the way, our discussion will also consider the history and architecture, benefits and challenges of aqueducts from ancient Rome through modern day America, as well as some of the preservation challenges and opportunities associated with sustainable stewardship of historic waterworks infrastructure.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Observe adaptively used examples of the Croton Aqueduct’s water infrastructural heritage.
  2. Learn about challenges and opportunities for sustainable stewardship of historic water infrastructure in New York.
  3. Learn about preservation protections (municipal, state, federal) for this heritage.

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 15
Transportation: Subway
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5

Coordinator:

  • Meisha Hunter

FS07 The Challenges of Preserving Governors Island National Monument    
8:00-12:30

clientuploads/2013_conference_art/FS07 Governors Island NPS Flickr Page Fort Jay Sally Port.jpgThe tour will bring visitors to Governors Island National Monument, in New York Harbor, home to two forts: Castle Williams and Fort Jay. Castle Williams was constructed of sandstone in 1811, and was recently the subject of an extensive masonry preservation effort: coatings removal, and stone and mortar replacement. The tour will focus on structural characteristics of the fort, deterioration characteristics of New Jersey sandstone and different mortars, the preservation work and its associated surprises and mistakes.

Fort Jay was constructed of sandstone, granite, and brick from 1796 to 1806. The focus of the Fort Jay tour will be on the condition of the masonry, preservation planning of the monumental sandstone gateway, and vegetation management. Visitors will be given a brief overview of the National Monument and the fortifications in New York Harbor. Castle William and Fort Jay were erected as part of the First and Second American Systems of Fortification, and are among the finest examples of defensive structures in use from the Renaissance to the American Civil War.

Governors Island was a military post and later a major command headquarters for the United States Army from 1794 until 1966. For the next 30 years, it was home to Atlantic Area Command, the U.S. Coast Guard's largest and most complex installation in the world. In 2003, the island was sold and transferred to two parties: 22 acres, designated as the Governors Island National Monument and administered by the National Park Service; and 150 acres is administered by The Trust for Governors Island.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will become familiar with the weathering properties of New Jersey sandstone
  2. Participants will become familiar with recent masonry preservation issues that include documentation, sandstone replacement, mortar replacement, coatings removal, and vegetation management
  3. Participants will become familiar with the structural details of Castle Williams that are unique to this type of fortification.

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 30
Transportation: Train and Ferry (ID required)
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5

Coordinator:

  • Judy Jacob, National Park Service

Facilitators:

  • David Bittermann, National Park Service
  • Mike Shaver, Park Ranger   
  • Collin Bell, Park Ranger

FS08 Conserving, Preserving and Interpreting the Tenement Museum
8:30-12:30   

https://asoft8226.accrisoft.com/apti/clientuploads/2013_conference_art/FS08 Tenement Museum Heddings Property WEB.jpgTour the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, one of the most dynamic new museums in America. The museum interprets the lives of 19th- and early 20th-century immigrants as well as architecture and change in a vernacular tenement. Tenement interiors include restored apartments and those preserved in a "ruined" condition.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explore issues inolved with preservation of vernacular building fabric planned for housing the poor.
  2. Analyze layers of change evident in paint, wallpaper, linoleums, etc. and discuss how these elements of the continuous history of the building have been restored and interpreted.
  3. Discuss sustainability of the house museum.  In contrast to many house museums with dwindling admissions, the Tenement Museum is overwhelmed with visitation.

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 15
Transportation: Subway
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5   

Coordinator:

  • Andrew Dolkart, Columbia University

FS09 Preservation Challenges of Mid-Century Modern in Midtown Manhattan   
8:30-12:30

A walking tour to several icons of mid-century modernism and a discussion of the preservation challenges and opportunities;  featuring buildings by LeCorbusier, Roche-Dinkeloo, Van de Rohe, Harrison & Abramovitz, Raymond Hood and others.

Learning Objectives:

  1. How to identify the significance/significant features of mid-century modern buildings
  2. Understanding preservation issues related to systems and materials used in mid-century modern buildings
  3. Learn from successful solutions to improving energy performance of building envelopes in mid-century modern buildings

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 25
Transportation: On foot
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5

Coordinator:

  • Michael F. Lynch, FAPT, P.E., AIA

FS10 MTA New York City Transit Preserving Historic Subway Stations for the Future
8:30-12:30

clientuploads/2013_conference_art/FS10 MtaColCir_20.jpgThis tour will focus on three NYCT landmark sites that were rehabilitated within the last three years. Discussions will include the historic background of each site, scope of work for each project, issues that came up during construction, lessons learned from each project, and specific materials that were repaired and replicated.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Importance of investigation and documentation during design phase
  2. Importance of project phasing and planning for long-lead items
  3. Challenges of working on a public transportation site that is also a landmark (priorities, etc.)

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 25
Transportation: On foot
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5

Coordinator:

  • Sara McIvor

Guide:

  • Judith Kunoff

FS11 Terra Cotta: The Transformation of the New York Facade
8:30-12:30

clientuploads/2013_conference_art/FS11 Terra Cotta by Jenn Cappetto.jpgThe field session will begin with a review of early commercial terra cotta at the Bowling Green Offices of 1895. Participants will review images from the original manufacturer to discuss the wall assembly.  We will look at several other Financial District buildings that make use of terra cotta, finishing up our downtown portion with a look at the Woolworth Building and its many generations of repair.  We then proceed by subway to a remarkable midtown block to see the progression of terra cotta as the material of choice for the growing midtown commercial district in the early Twentieth Century.  Finally we will look at the innovative use of the material by the Blum Brothers on the Upper West Side.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understanding the variety of assemblies in terra cotta facades
  2. Understanding the evolution of Terra Cotta and support assemblies

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 12
Transportation: Subway
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5

Coordinator:

  • Dan Allen, CTA Architects

 
FS12 The South Street Seaport – Preserving Two Centuries of Building Technology    
8:30-12:30

clientuploads/2013_conference_art/FS12 Seaport.jpgUntil merchant vessels became too large to navigate the East River, the South Street Seaport area was arguably the busiest merchant port in the US. This activity resulted in numerous purpose-built buildings and other features: counting houses, hotels, markets, loading slips, the construction of which frequently reflected the latest in construction technology. By the 1820s, the Fulton Fish Market had been established in the Seaport, and became the largest fish market in the country; although by the 1950s, much of the fish commerce was handled by trucks.

The Seaport area survived the great fire of 1835, was nearly demolished in the 1980s at which time the South Street Seaport Museum brought new life to the area – and new construction continues into the 21st Century. Today the Seaport presents the viewer with a timeline of commercial construction and building technology that encompasses three centuries of the building arts.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Early 19th-century construction methods
  2. Reshaping the water front – from the early Seaport to PLANYC
  3. Protecting historic buildings in waterfront areas

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 16
Transportation: On foot
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5

Facilitators:

  • Jerry Gallagher, South Street Seaport Museum
  • Robert Warner, Bowne and Company
  • Gregg Pasquarelli, Shop Architects

FS13 Preserving the Ephemeral: Investigating World’s Fair Remnants at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park   
8:30-12:30

Once home to two World’s Fairs (1939-40 and 1964-65), Flushing Meadow-Corona Park in Queens, NY is today a thriving urban park. Several remnants from both ephemeral fairs were retained and serve as reminders of an era where world’s fairs were celebrated for showcasing most cutting edge American culture, commerce and technology of the day. These remnants are managed and cared for by both the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation and the Department of Cultural Affairs.

This field session will take a closer look at the following: The Unisphere, New York State Pavilion, Queens Museum of Art, New York Hall of Science, Terrace on the Park, time capsules, and several outdoor statuary and objects. During this field session, we will discuss not only the history of these structures and objects, but the preservation challenges they have faced and their future within the larger master plan of the park.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Examine the history of the remnants from the fair, how they have been preserved and what role they play in the larger master plan for Flushing Meadows-Corona Park
  2. Discuss the validity of preserving design elements, which may or may not have been intended to be ephemeral
  3. Examine the role that World’s Fair remnants play in capturing specific moments in the history of technology.

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 14
Transportation: Subway
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5

Coordinator:

  • Susan Singh

FS14 Restoring Significant Mausolea – Involving Descendants in the Care and Conservation of Family Tombs    
8:30-12:30

clientuploads/2013_conference_art/BellmontGroupGargoyles.jpgThe Woodlawn Cemetery is aggressively tracking down the family members in an effort to restore and maintain a collection of 1300 private mausolea. This session will address what happens when descendants are located, how the cemetery presents information about the structure and how to offer alternatives to suit budgets and levels of interest while meeting preservation standards.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Providing alternative conservation methods and sources to suit client’s budget
  2. Counseling of distant client on historic significance and need for appropriate methods
  3. Counseling of client on monument decline and regular maintenance

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 24
Transportation: Subway
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5

Facilitators:

  • Susan Olsen, Woodlawn Cemetery
  • Robert Scheer, Woodlawn Cemetery

FS15 Central Park: Preservation Perspectives    
8:30-12:30

clientuploads/2013_conference_art/FS15 Central Park.jpgCentral Park is one of the most celebrated designed landscapes in the world. It is designated a National Historic Landmark as well as a Scenic Landmark of the City of New York. The 843‐acre landscape was created to provide New Yorkers with the experience of a rural retreat within the confines of the city. Its construction was a marvel of nineteenth‐century engineering: an elaborate drainage system was devised to direct storm water and transform natural swamps into lakes and ponds; soil was hauled in and topography manipulated and planted to create sweeping meadows and picturesque woods; and workers blasted through bedrock in order to lay in a circulation system of pedestrian paths ingeniously separated by grade from an equestrian trail, a carriage drive, and four sunken transverse roads designed to accommodate cross‐town traffic without disrupting the scenic experience of the Park. During this walking tour of Central Park, we will discuss the design and history of the Park focusing on ongoing and recently completed restoration projects preformed by the Central Park Conservancy.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explore the unique relationship and development of Central Park and New York City.
  2. View and discuss the application of preservation technologies utilized to restoration of key features of the Parks.
  3. Discuss the interdisciplinary management required to restore and maintain the Park.

Fees: $40
Includes: Guided tour, CEs, materials if provided by facilitators, transportation
Capacity: 25
Transportation: Subway
Dress Code: Casual with good walking shoes
Handicapped Accessibility: Ask APT for details.
Continuing Education: 3.5

Coordinator:

  • Christopher Nolan, NYC Central Park

Guide:

  • Brian Purcell, NYC Central Park
NYC

For the first time in history, the population of cities exceeds that of the surrounding suburbs and countryside. New York City, after decades of population decline, has recently exceeded its peak 1970s population and continues to grow. Such growth, mirrored in older and newer cities globally, is countered by cities with shrinking populations in the United States and abroad. Both expanding and shrinking cities present new challenges that require preservationists to think broadly and collaboratively, themes that will be highlighted at APT NYC 2013.